Rebellious Adventist Teen Claims Drums Solve Everything

Cody taking a break from practice...
Cody taking a break from practice…
DULUTH, Ga. — Cody Huckley, a 16-year-old Adventist junior at Atlanta Adventist Academy, has begun touring churches around the country with a burning message he’s titled All We Need is Drums.

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Cody says that he decided to launch his ministry because of his deeply-held belief that drums hold the solution to every major doctrinal and cultural issue challenging the Adventist church today.

Each presentation begins with Cody jumping on stage, grabbing a mic and yelling “Here’s how to make church awesome!” before attacking a drum set for 20 minutes with near superhuman rage and an enthusiastically chaotic sound that has led older audience members to bow their heads in prayer, hands firmly clasped around their ears.

“I was tired of being bored in church,” said Cody in a front-page interview for Insight Magazine. “So I decided that I could sit around and complain or start touring with my drum set.”

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Churches around the country have booked Cody for his All We Need is Drums Tour. “While we may have some questions about his reasoning, methods, conclusions, presentations style and haircut, it’s nice to see a young man willing to march to the beat of a different drum, or in the case of a lot of our churches, any drum beat at all,” said Atlanta Adventist Academy Chaplain, Jermaine Baker.

Cody’s supporters are convinced that his provocative presentations are doing more good than harm. Some fans have tried suggesting to Cody that there may be some church problems outside the healing reach of even the loudest drum sets. He has yet to be persuaded.


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6 Comments

  1. Richard Mills

    7/20/14
    The ears can not endure sounds above 85 decibels for an extended length of time, like church services. Doesn’t matter if is a pastor’s voice or the drums. Maybe this is why most SDA’s cannot remember the sermon! Let’s sign this guy up for 2015 camp meetings & the 2015 GC. Maybe the GYC? The next Pathfinder Camporee?? Oh-Oh,they already have the drums ready for August. BOOM-BOOM-BOOM. What happened to the Lil’ Drummer Boy? Woe is me!!

  2. Wilbur Mac

    As a drum set enters the sanctuary to “fill out” an ensemble’s sound, it is placed center stage. Excuses for this include the statement that acoustics require that the “instrument” be in that location to equalize the vibes. Since it cannot play a tune, it must accompany each and every other instrument present. Another excuse is that because it is the largest item on the platform, aesthetics require it to be centered. Both of these reasons are foolishness. The reason it is placed centerstage is so that it can serve as the idol of the venue and to show that no matter what argument was used in convincing those in charge of the “happening” that drums were a good thing to include, the end fact is that “we showed those conservatives, didn’t we?”

    There is no good reason for drums to be on a church platform, either in a formal service or at any other time. There is no need for a “beat” to be identified, unless the other musicians are so helpless in their skills as to need to have such a crutch to perform, in which case they are in the wrong business or hobby. One minister conducted his Bible classes on the floor in front of the platform and paced back and forth in front of a huge drum set onstage. This constitutes a godly influence? I think not. It only stressed the fact that no matter what or how good the material was, the worship included an idol and much of what was said was totally lost.

    Drums in church? I vote NO!

    • APlusDave

      Seriously? I certainly hope not. Otherwise your argument will be used against the huge pipe organs many of our larger edifices have directly behind the pulpit. The argument is ridiculous on the face, and I can’t sense any attempt at humor.

      At some point we will understand that the point is not the music but the message. I recall asking my mother why it was more ‘worshipful’ to listen to music composed by a guy who died of a sexually-transmitted disease, than one who did not. Basically, she liked classical, not contemporary.

      Many movies and television shows have used classical clips for their themes, so not even that genre is safe for use in church.

      Miriam played the tambourine when she danced for joy at the celebration after the Israelites were led out of Egypt. Apparently two wrongs do make a right!

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